Nutrition

Everything You Need to Know About the Vestibular Migraine Diet

Vestibular Migraine Diet
A rare type of migraine marked by vertigo or dizziness is called a vestibular migraine, which is frequently misdiagnosed. It might all negatively impact your physical, emotional, and social well-being and can be alienating and disruptive.  There are often unanticipated obstacles on the path of living with vestibular migraines. The wavering nausea, dizziness, and disorientation may negatively impact your everyday life. Against this backdrop of complexity, nutrition plays a key role in effectively treating vestibular migraine illness.  The Vestibular Migraine Diet is a customized approach to food decisions intended to reduce the frequency and severity of these episodes. In this blog post, we’ll explore its principles. What is a Vestibular Migraine Diet? The Vestibular Migraine Diet is a planned eating strategy designed to help effectively manage vestibular migraines by identifying and removing possible triggers. This targeted diet focuses on elements that are particularly connected to vertigo and dizziness, as well as typical migraine diets that target headache/migraine triggers. Comprehending this diet entails realizing the complex interactions between your food intake and how your vestibular system’s delicate balance is impacted. Developing a lifestyle that supports your well-being by limiting factors that may increase vestibular migraine symptoms is more important than simply avoiding alcohol and caffeine. Impact of Diet on Vestibular Migraines Managing vestibular migraine attacks requires an understanding of the complex relationship between your food and these events. A mix of physiological mechanisms and stimuli are involved in this interaction. 1. Trigger Foods Foods and drinks with certain ingredients may trigger vestibular migraines. Individual differences in these triggers mean pinpointing your case’s exact perpetrators is crucial. Prolonged exposure to aged cheeses, processed meats, caffeine, alcohol, and chemicals like MSG are common triggers. 2. Neurotransmitter Imbalance Certain meals may affect brain neurotransmitter levels and thus be a factor in vestibular migraines. Tyramine, for instance, may impact serotonin levels, which are involved in mood regulation and the avoidance of migraines. Comprehending these associations facilitates customizing your diet to reduce the likelihood of inducing migraines. 3. Variations in Blood Sugar Vibrational migraines may also be impacted by abnormalities in blood sugar levels. Fast fluctuations in blood sugar brought on by skipping meals or eating items high in sugar have the potential to start an episode. One of the most critical aspects of managing migraines may be keeping blood sugar stable through balanced meals. 4. Dehydration Dehydration is a common migraine cause, including vestibular migraines. Dehydration can worsen the symptoms of migraine by affecting blood flow, circulation, and electrolyte balance. Drinking enough water throughout the day for hydration is a straightforward and easy preventative measure.  5. Inflammatory Response Vestibular migraines can occur in certain people as a component of a more generalized inflammatory reaction. Specific foods, particularly those heavy in processed carbohydrates and saturated fats, may trigger an inflammatory response. Vestibular migraine frequency and intensity may be decreased by following an anti-inflammatory diet high in fruits, vegetables, and omega-3 fatty acids. People can decrease the impact of vestibular migraines by making educated dietary choices and being aware of these mechanisms. Following a Vestibular Migraine Diet The Vestibular Migraine Diet is a thoughtful process that begins with self-awareness. Step 1: The first step involves keeping a detailed food diary to identify potential triggers specific to your case. Record what you eat, the timing of your meals, and any symptoms that may follow. This is helpful to rule out potential problematic things like aspartame, MSG, and sulphites.  Step 2: Phase two starts once you’ve gathered the above information. It’s time to work with a healthcare professional or a registered dietitian specializing in vestibular migraines. If you don’t have access to one, or can’t afford one, we recommend doing some research online to formulate a healthy, sustainable diet that excludes triggers, but incorporates healthy whole foods. Step 3: Phase involves building on this foundation and gradually eliminating certain foods can help you identify suspected trigger foods. If you feel a period of clarity, certain foods or ingredients can be reintroduced to see if they still impact you. This process requires patience, as triggers can vary widely among individuals. Step 4: Last but not least, pay close attention to how your body responds to changes and adjust accordingly in phase four. Slowly reintroduce eliminated foods into your diet and check how your body responds. You can continue consuming food that does not tr ...

Food Freedom: All You Need to Know

Food Freedom
Have you tried to live a more health-conscious lifestyle but found yourself failing miserably after starting a new diet? We’ve been there. You aren’t alone. Studies show that almost 65% of people, 2 out of 3 people, who start dieting eventually quit and become regressive eaters due to excessive control or hyper fixation over their food choices for an extended duration. How to decide what to eat? How to make the right eating choices? How do you achieve your health goals without depriving yourself of your favorite foods? The answer to all these concerns is referred to as “food freedom.” Read on to learn all about it as the simplest method to achieve your health goals! What Does the Term Food Freedom Mean? As the term suggests, food freedom is the “freedom” to eat anything and everything you desire—within reasonable constraints. When people start to suppress their dietary urges, they develop uncomfortable or unhealthy long-term habits. This lingering guilt hovers over people’s heads like a cloud whenever they enter a fast food joint or take another sip of wine. It results in increasing mental anxiety and stress.  Thus, setting your mind free from feelings of guilt when you pick up that one extra slice of pizza is essential to longevity. Having said that, food freedom doesn’t mean that people should not take into consideration the nutritional quality of food, its importance, and its impact on bodily functions.  We need to understand that eating in the right proportions and making better eating choices is essential, but at the same time, managing a healthy and peaceful mental space is equally important. How to Create Balance? Creating balance starts with education. It is the core tenet behind achieving your health goals and leading a healthy life—knowledge is power, and you need to know what and how your body responds to and processes certain foods. Sometimes, it’s intuitive. You know yourself and your body better than anyone else ever could.  Learn the nutritional facts about what you’re ingesting and fueling your body with. Then, apply that knowledge to creating balanced meals—vegans can learn how to create plant-based protein-rich meals, while omnivores can learn how to reduce red meat intake and prioritize fish and veggies.  You can indulge in that second slice of pizza guilt-free but don’t make it a daily habit. Create a habit of mindful eating. Mindful eating is being consciously aware of what you are doing. It includes the following four parameters: Paying attention to yourself—are you hungry or full? How energetic are you? Do you feel stressed? Avoid multitasking while eating—be physically and mentally present in the moment while eating. Avoid watching television or scrolling on your phone. Chew food slowly.  Enjoy the food—take time to eat and feel its taste, smell, and texture. Digestion begins in the mouth.  Do not judge yourself. Most importantly, do not guilt trip. If you decide to have something, do not worry about the past or the future implications of your dietary choice at that moment, work on making permanent, lasting changes long-term.  Fears Associated with “Dieting” Dieting is a scary term to most people. This is because, for most people, it is associated with the idea of eating less and living on soups and salads to lose weight. Forget indulging in your favorite foods—dieting is about this idea of sacrifice.  However, this perception is entirely wrong.  There are hundreds of healthy food options. Living in a rich culture, with readily available plant foods means we now have the ability, more than ever before, to make better dietary choices without depriving ourselves. Telling yourself not to eat certain types of food to lose weight, for instance, does the opposite of its intended purpose.  When you think to “not” eat something, you are, in reality, constantly thinking about eating it and then restricting yourself, which leads to stress building and further increases the desire for the “forbidden” food. The term “diet” includes everything you eat in the entire day. Hence, dieting doesn’t mean stopping altogether, but being more mindful of what you eat. What you need is a properly balanced diet to achieve your health goals and live a healthy life. Until now, we have talked about the importance of food freedom and how indulging in your cravings is not a sin. However, we also need to understand that while you should give in to cravings occasionally, it is always crucial to be mindful of what you eat. Importance of Food Freedom Practicing food freedom is good for both physical and mental health.  First, it helps you to better understand the body in relation to what you eat. Secondly, practicing food freedom helps eliminate feelings of guilt and stress from following strict food rules, and obsessive dieting. You actually enjoy your favorite food rather than ...

Your Ultimate Guide to Understanding Sports Nutrition

Sports Nutrition
Sports nutrition is the study and practice of nutrition and diet with regard to improving athletic performance. Nutrition is a significant aspect of numerous sports training regimens. It figures heavily into strength sports like weightlifting and bodybuilding, and endurance sports like cycling, running, swimming and paddling.  Sports nutrition concentrates on which foods and liquids an athlete takes in and how they do it. It manages the use of supplements, such as vitamins, minerals, and organic substances that incorporate carbohydrates, proteins and fats.  How is sports nutrition different from regular nutrition? Sports nutrition varies from regular nutrition, since athletes require different measures of supplements and nutrients than non-athletes. For athletes to perform well, they have to train hard and fuel their bodies with the right foods and supplements. Nothing can substitute for a balanced diet. A healthy, energy-rich diet gives athletes the vitality and strength to play their best, and helps prevent injuries and enable quick recovery. Factors influencing nutritional requirements An effective sports nutrition plan cannot be administered with a one-size-fits-all approach. Athletes’ diets are tailored to their circumstances and needs. Some factors that influence nutritional needs include the athlete’s gender, weight, physique and BMI, the type of activity or exercise, and the time of day.  Factors that impede performance are exhaustion, injury and soreness; an appropriate eating program will diminish these problems. The key to an effective nutritional regimen is to include a variety of foods and to ensure all the necessary vitamins, minerals and nutrients are covered. It’s important to choose whole unprocessed foods; for instance, an orange rather than orange juice. Eating natural, whole foods gives the athlete the greatest dietary benefit. 1. Gender There are clear contrasts between male and female anatomy. While the physiology is essentially the same, the way men and women process nutrients is different. Men have a lower ratio of muscle to fat; however, they tend to carry most of their fat in the adipose tissue located in the abdominal region. Women have a higher ratio of fat, which they store mostly in the subcutaneous layer of their hip region. 2. Anaerobic exercise  During anaerobic exercise, the process of glycolysis separates the sugars from starches for energy without the use of oxygen. This kind of exercise includes activities like power runs, resistance training, and exercises that use quick movements to work the muscles for force and speed, with short-time energy use. After this type of activity, the body needs to be refueled. 3. Aerobic exercise  Exercise that requires oxygen for cellular reactions is called cardiovascular conditioning, or cardio. Aerobic exercise includes activities like running, cycling, swimming, and paddling. Athletes who engage in aerobic exercise are working to build their endurance. They are training their slow-twitch muscles to absorb more oxygen and get it to their muscles.  Types of Nutrients Macronutrients Macronutrients make up the major sources of calories that give the body energy. They are needed for proper cell development and to maintain regular body functions. These nutrients are required by the body in large quantities to sustain life. There are three kinds of macronutrients:  Carbohydrates Proteins Fats Carbohydrates contribute significantly to waste disposal and intestinal health. Carbohydrates can be found in milk products, fruits, vegetables and grains, and give the body 4 calories for each gram.  Proteins are made out of chains of amino acids. They are mostly found in animal products, nuts and beans, and provide 4 calories per gram. Fats are the most energy-rich macronutrient and provide the most significant caloric content, giving the body 9 calories for every gram. Micronutrients Micronutrients are the 13 organic vitamins and seven inorganic minerals that the human body needs in small amounts every day. Micronutrients play a significant role in energy creation, hemoglobin synthesis, development, bone and immune health, and digestion. Though the required amounts are small, as the name suggests, it’s important to maintain the right level of these nutrients and minerals in the body.  The 13 vitamins can be sorted into two categories: water-soluble and fat-soluble. The eight water-soluble nutrients –the vitamins B and vitamin C – must be taken every day, as the body can't store what it doesn't promptly utilize. Interestingly, the fat-soluble vitamins K, A, D and E can be stored in the body's fat tissue. Consequently, they don’t need to be consumed on a daily basis to maintain the correct levels. Hydration and performance Adequate hydration and electrolyte levels are fundamental for good he ...

Going Ketogenic? Here’s Everything You Need to Know

Ketogenic Diet
The ketogenic diet, commonly known as the keto diet, is a nutritional regimen that focuses on foods with a high fat, low carbohydrate content. The efficiency standard of this diet is high. More than 20 studies have shown that keto is not only effective for losing weight but can also boost your immune system and improve your overall health. It has also proved useful in treating illnesses like diabetes, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer. Many people who follow the keto diet augment it with appropriate multivitamin supplements. Here is a thorough guide to the keto diet. What is a keto diet? The keto diet is a nutritional regimen that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat. It’s like a combination of low-carb and Atkins diets. It generally involves substituting a high intake of fat for carbohydrates in your diet. The restriction of carbohydrates forces the body into a metabolic state known as ketosis. The keto diet can reduce insulin resistance and help control blood sugar levels. This is how it’s different from other diet plans. Some benefits of the keto diet are: Can lower triglyceride levels by up to 44% Can lower the frequency of seizures in 75.8% of epileptic children Athletes can burn 2.3 times more body fat when following a keto diet, making it highly effective for weight loss What makes the keto diet a good nutritional regimen? Researchers have stated that the keto diet is a great choice for regulating metabolic syndrome since it generates energy from fats and not carbohydrates. Macronutrient balance The balance of macronutrients is different in the keto diet: over 50% fat and around 10% carbohydrates. In a normal diet, the ratios are reversed.  A keto diet consists of 20% protein, which is higher than the amount in a regular diet. Calorie count Calorie counting is not as important in the keto diet, compared to this being the basis of a regular weight-loss diet. The keto diet is best suited to people who are prone to certain diseases or who want to shed a few pounds.  A normal diet is considered the easiest to follow. It doesn’t eliminate carbohydrates from the menu, but it keeps the fat content low and increases protein intake. The keto diet, on the other hand, requires you to consume foods that are rich in fats. For better results, you can complement a keto diet with physical training sessions, as well as multivitamin supplements. Exercise helps break down excess fat and stimulates the digestive system. Studies on the keto diet broadly state that people who engage in any type of physical activity have a lower risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Consuming low-carb foods helps accelerate weight loss. People who suffer from obesity or other bodyweight problems may benefit from following the keto diet. It is known as a heart-healthy diet because it can reduce the amount of fat stored in the body and lower the risk of stroke or heart failure. Types of keto diets The keto diet has been modified to provide a wide range of benefits that meet different people’s requirements. The keto diet is widely accepted because it forces the body into a state of ketosis. In this state, the body stops using carbohydrates as its main source of energy and starts burning excess body fat, instead. Therapeutic keto diet The original version of the keto diet was developed in 1920 to treat convulsions. According to a study based on current treatment options in neurology, the therapeutic keto diet was mainly used to treat people suffering from epilepsy who had a low response to medication. The study shows that strictly adhering to the keto diet can lower the risk of seizures and lead to massive improvements in the symptoms of metabolic syndrome. This diet features the lowest carbohydrate intake: 6% protein, 4% carbs, and 90% fats. This strictest interpretation of the keto diet is very tough to follow. Standard keto diet This is the most commonly practiced version of the keto diet. It derives 75% of its calories from fat, 5% from carbohydrates, and 20% from protein. The daily intake of carbohydrates is limited to between 20 and 30 grams. Compared to a regular diet, the standard keto diet is pretty low in carbohydrates and protein. Targeted keto diet for athletes This keto diet combines physical training with supplements and a low-carb intake ‒ a mere 25 grams of carbohydrates can be eaten after 30 to 45 minutes of vigorous exercise. The aim of this practice is to fuel your training session and let your body easily return to the ketosis state. On a keto diet, you consume carbohydrates that are easy for the body to break down, such as white rice, bread, avocado, kale, asparagus, and macadamia nuts. Your intake of carbohydrates should not add to your existing body fat. Strictly following the keto diet for 28 days is said to improve performance in endurance athletes. This generally suits people who do muscle-building workouts, including swi ...

How to Boost Your Immune System

What is the immune system? The immune system is one of the most important mechanisms of the human body. This is because it’s the body’s natural defense against illness. The immune system attacks and destroys invading pathogens to keep the body free from disease.  This vast network of cells, tissues, proteins, and organs fights off diseases and infections by identifying viruses, bacteria and parasites, and neutralizing these threats. It is constantly at work.  Once this defense system encounters a pathogen, it deploys an immune response to fight and kill it. The most important thing about this system is that it can distinguish the body's healthy tissue from foreign, disease-causing tissue. Dead and faulty cells are also identified and eliminated by the immune system. How does the immune response work? The immune system can be activated by a lot of different organisms that the body doesn’t recognize. The substances that activate the immune response are called antigens.  Antigens include the proteins on the surfaces of bacteria, fungi, and viruses. When these antigens come into contact with the special receptors on the immune system cells, a whole series of processes are triggered in the body.  When the body is exposed to a disease-causing germ for the first time, the immune system usually stores data about the pathogen and how to fight it. Then, if the same type of germ invades again, the immune system recognizes it right away and starts fighting it sooner. Diseases related to the immune system The immune system is a very complex mechanism. This complexity means there are opportunities for disorders to disrupt the system. Following are the different types of immune system disorders: 1. Immunodeficiencies Immunodeficiency is the lack or absence of immune system cells in the body. Simply put, one or more parts of the immune system do not work properly.  Immunodeficiencies can be caused by a number of factors, including age, obesity and alcoholism.  In underdeveloped countries, malnutrition is a common cause of immunodeficiency. In some cases, the condition is inherited.  2. Autoimmunity Autoimmunity is a condition in which the immune system mistakenly targets and destroys the body’s healthy cells. In this case, the immune system is not able to distinguish between its own healthy cells and foreign pathogens or faulty cells.  The body’s cells also have surface proteins, called autoantibodies. But they are not the antibodies that should trigger the immune system.  When the immune system cannot distinguish its own tissues from foreign tissues, it attacks healthy, harmless cells in the body. Autoimmune diseases include celiac disease, Type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. 3. Hypersensitivity Hypersensitivity is when the immune system overreacts to such a degree that it damages healthy tissues. An example is anaphylaxis, when the body’s response to an allergen is so strong that it can be life-threatening. Immune System Boosters Some people have strong immune systems, while others have weak ones. The good news is that you can strengthen your immune system through a proper diet and a healthy lifestyle. Certain foods, supplements, and lifestyle changes will have a positive effect on your ability to stay healthy.  Herbs that boost the immune system Many natural substances are known to boost immunity. Since ancient times, herbs and spices have been in high demand for both their healing properties and their ability to help people stay well. According to the World Health Organization, over 80% of the world’s population uses herbal medicines and herbs as part of their primary healthcare.  Most of the preferred herbs are high in anti-inflammatory properties, which help bolster the body’s natural immunity. Most of these herbs and spices are relatively safe, compared to allopathic medicines like antibiotics, which can have serious side effects. Here’s a list of herbs and spices that can help improve immunity: 1. Holy basil  Holy basil is a very old medicinal herb. Its leaves are rich in phytonutrients.  Basil is also rich in chlorophyll, vitamins and minerals, and eugenol. Eugenol is a bioactive compound with antifungal, antimicrobial, and antibacterial properties, which can help reduce stress and lower plasma glucose levels.  How to consume basil: You can simply chew fresh basil leaves in the morning or infuse them in your morning tea. Just ensure that you wash them well in running water before using them. 1. Ginger  Ginger is widely used in Indian cooking to add flavor to dishes. This popular spice has antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties.  Since ancient times, ginger has been extensively used for treating asthma, travel sickness, morning sickness, colds, coughs, nausea, arthritis, gastrointestinal complaints, and even depres ...