Tagged with 'lavender'

A Herb for Calm: Lavender

Lavender Herb
Lavendula angustifolia is a scent that most of us can recognize perhaps you’ve had the good fortune of visiting a field full of lavender to experience it. At one time, lavender was a natural, wild-crafted crop that could easily be cut and harvested in the hills of the Mediterranean. Over time, it was domesticated and has gradually become one of the major ingredients in the manufacture of perfume and scented cosmetics. The highest-quality essential oil is derived from steam-distilling fresh lavender flowers. The amount of volatile oil found in lavender is often very small; it makes up only 0.005–10 percent of a single plant. To obtain 454 ml (1 lb) of this essential oil, you need 150 lbs of lavender. Knowing this, we might wish to consider using essential oils sparingly, as large quantities of land and plant life are required to produce even small amounts of essential oils. Plant Description  Lavendula angustifolia (English Lavender) is a perennial plant native to Eastern Europe, northern Africa, and the Mediterranean. There are many genotypes, but English Lavender is most commonly grown and used. It has narrow, grey-green leaves and a long spike with purple flowers that attract pollinators. The flowers are covered in star-shaped hairs. The name Lavendula originates from the Latin lavare, meaning washing or bathing; the herb was venerated for its cleansing and purifying properties. The Romans used lavender to perfume their baths, and for centuries it has been infused into laundry water in Europe. The Virgin Mary is reputed to have been especially fond of lavender because it protected clothes from insects and preserved chastity.  Pedanius Dioscorides - a Greek physician, pharmacologist, and botanist posited that the fragrance of lavender surpassed all other perfumes. Herbalists in 16th-century Europe Herbal Profile Lavendula angustifolia (formerly Lavendula officinalis)  Common Name: Lavender, lavendula, lavandin Family: Lamiaceae, mint family Parts Used: Aerial parts—flowers, flower buds, leaves. Collect fully-opened flowers and leaves, usually between June and August. They should be gently dried at a temperature not exceeding 40°C.  Taste: Cool, aromatic, dry Energy: Cool, relaxant ACTIVE CONSTITUENTS: Lavender has over 100 constituents, including: Tannins, 0.5–¹ /5% volatile oil, coumarins (including coumarin, umbelliferon and herniarin), flavonoids (such as luteolin), 0.7% ursolic acid (found in the leaves)³  The essential oil contains: Linalyl acetate, geraniol, cineole, limonene and sesquiterpenes4 , linalool (which has the distinct smell of lavender)  Herbal actions: Nervous antidepressant, anxiolytic, and relaxant; digestive anti-inflammatory, carminative, antacid, and anti-emetic; integumentary anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and cicatrizant SYSTEM TROPISM: Nervous System: Nerves, muscles, neurovascular system  Digestive System: Stomach, intestines, liver Integumentary System Did you know? One of Ontario's loveliest jars of honey comes from a small organic farm in Prince Edward County that grows organic lavender and keeps honeybees. 24 the whole family | Look Inward Early Summer 2023 recognized lavender’s medicinal virtues, and the Italian herbalist, Mattiolus, observed that “it is much used in maladies and those disorders of the brain due to coldness such as epilepsy, apoplexy, spasms and paralysis; it comforts the stomach and is a great help in obstructions of the liver and spleen. Medicinal Properties & Indications  Nervous System  Lavender is a wonderfully uplifting and calming herb. It can lighten the mind, helping us to move through emotional blocks that may present as anxiety, emotional instability, and depression. Herbalist David Winston describes using it for stagnant depression, a situational depression often associated with emotional trauma, where one seems to be “stuck” on an event replaying over and over in their mind. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the unrelenting grief of becoming fixated on a traumatic event or tragedy (e.g., loss of a child, parent, spouse, pet, or job) fall into this category. Lavender may remedy physical symptoms as well, such as tension, headaches, migraines, trembling, and insomnia. Lavender in the bath, either the herb itself or a few drops of essential oil, can ease a restless child or adult to sleep. It works especially well when combined with Epsom salts. Sleeping with a lavender pillow is an age-old remedy to induce a restful night as well (see recipe at the end of this article). When used for aromatherapy, the essential oil of lavender was found to benefit sleep in studies done in elder care facilities. The residents fell asleep with greater ease and had improved sleep quality. This purple herb may also be used as a strengthening tonic for the nervous system to treat those suffering from nervous debility and exhaustion. Indications: » Anxiety  » Depression&nb ...

Healthy Planet DIY Herbal Healing Bath Infusion

Take a load off - you deserve to relax and give yourself a treat this weekend. Baths are an amazing opportunity to relax the body and reap in beneficial nutrients for the skin. I like to make my own healing bath infusions and have been for years. They are relatively easy to make and I’m a firm believer of the simpler the better, always. What You’ll Need:- Organic cotton mesh cloth or hemp cloth also works fine as well- @ifyoucare_usa Twine or cotton string - @nowfoodsofficial Essential Oils (For a bath, I like to choose lavender and rosemary) - Dried Lavender, - Rose Petals  (feel free to also add dried lemongrass and dried peppermint - @celticseasalt Epsom Salt - @organictraditions Coconut Oil How To: 1. Cut a 7x7 “ inch square with the fabric.2. Take 1 cup of epsom salt and add it to the center.3. Mix in the dried rose and lavender flowers.4. Drop 10 drops of lavender essential oil onto the salt and dried flowers.5. Drop 5 drops of rosemary essential oil to the sale and dried flowers.6. Add 2 tablespoons of coconut oil onto the mixture.7. Take the 4 corners of the fabric and wrap the edges.8. Bunch the excess fabric up in your fist with one hand and take the piece of string and wrap the string around the fabric. Benefits:* Rosewater relieves inflammation/ soothes irritated skin, brightens your complexion, tightens pores and smells amazing* Rosemary stimulates circulation, will help relieve muscle aches/soreness, has been shown to boost memory and clear congestion simply by being inhaled* Lavender works as a “anxiolytic” (anxiety reliever) it calms the nerves, reduces anxiety/aggression/depression and does wonders for the skin* Epsom Salts contain magnesium which also help to relax and soothe muscles. Salt water in general is super healing, good for energy cleansing I am against most bath bombs because they contain artificial fragrances, artificial perfume and or scented ingredients that do not offer any health benefits. These artificial compounds are harmful to our health, waterways and wreak havoc once absorbed. Bath bombs look great but majority of them are full of toxins and allergens Dedicating one hour from your weekend to invest in yourself will refuel you! Try this simple bath infusion today!   Follow along with Healthy Planet as we collaborate with Stephanie Wong bringing you everything from Cruelty Free Beauty to All--Natural Living Tips! Written and Created by @5teffy